BeautySupply https://www.beautyproducts.online Cosmetics Fragrances and Beauty Products, Hair Care, Men's Perfume, Fragrance Women, Oils Makeup and nails, Health Beauty new releases and news Fri, 24 Jan 2020 13:02:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.2 https://i0.wp.com/www.beautyproducts.online/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/cropped-cropped-Beauty-160-x-160-1.png?fit=32%2C32&ssl=1 BeautySupply https://www.beautyproducts.online 32 32 120636486 Skydiving, kayaking, fly fishing: Virtual reality therapy is taking paralyzed veterans to new places – Tech Xplore https://www.beautyproducts.online/skydiving-kayaking-fly-fishing-virtual-reality-therapy-is-taking-paralyzed-veterans-to-new-places-tech-xplore/ Fri, 24 Jan 2020 13:02:11 +0000 https://www.beautyproducts.online/skydiving-kayaking-fly-fishing-virtual-reality-therapy-is-taking-paralyzed-veterans-to-new-places-tech-xplore/ Credit: CC0 Public Domain A car wreck in 1983 paralyzed Navy veteran Mike Erbe from the waist down, but he fought to stay positive, stay active. He finished his engineering degree. He got his pilot’s license. It’s getting harder though as he gets older, especially while staring at four hospital walls. A urinary tract infection

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veteran Credit: CC0 Public Domain

A car wreck in 1983 paralyzed Navy veteran Mike Erbe from the waist down, but he fought to stay positive, stay active. He finished his engineering degree. He got his pilot’s license.

It’s getting harder though as he gets older, especially while staring at four hospital walls. A that became life-threatening landed Erbe, 72, of Alton, in the St. Louis VA Medical Center last fall, where he has since been trying to recover.

But lately, he’s been fly fishing, downhill skiing and floating around in a spacecraft, which is helping a lot.

During Erbe’s recent visit to what patients call the “vet cave” at the Jefferson Barracks facility—a hangout with adaptive games and exercise equipment—recreational therapist Matt Luitjohan straps large goggles over his eyes.

“Are you going to fly with the Blue Angels today?” asks Luitjohan, who specifically works with spinal cord injury patients.

“Yeah, let’s do that,” Erbe answered eagerly.

Last summer, the St. Louis VA began integrating into therapy for patients with paralysis. Much more than a cool diversion or entertainment, it’s a useful tool in helping patients cope and encouraging them to lead active lives.

When wearing the goggles, users see a simulated, three-dimensional world. The latest technology includes wireless hand-held joysticks that allow users to manipulate and explore their virtual surroundings. They can move through a small space with perceived barriers such as a wall or edge.

“You can look down and see your feet. It’s like you are standing on a pier fishing. Everything looks right. When you move, it feels like you are walking down the pier,” Erbe said. “You really feel like, oh my god, I’m going too fast or I’m going too far.”

Patients can box, learn tai chi, shoot a bow and arrow, and even feel like they are reeling in a big fish.

“We can have a veteran in a funk, where their life has drastically changed, and show them that just because things are different, doesn’t mean you can’t do this or do that. It’s still possible,” Luitjohan said. “It just takes adaptations.”

New therapeutic programs designed for virtual reality not only can help with pain management and behavioral therapy, but also have the capability of measuring things such as reaction time, range of motion and cognitive function to determine whether patients are progressing.

One maker of the applications, XRHealth, was founded about four years ago in Israel. The St. Louis VA is one of 50 hospitals in the two countries—and the only veterans’ hospital—using the company’s technology to improve health in a variety of ways, says CEO Eran Orr.

“At the end of day, we believe this technology can help patients improve their well-being and improve health outcomes,” Orr said. “We believe we should treat this technology as a medical device, not just another gaming or patient-experience tool.”

Life Wasn’t Over

“Ohhh, dude. He’s about 20-feet off the runway, burning down the runway. Oh no. Hard turn,” Erbe said as he virtually flies in with the U.S. Navy’s aerobatic demonstration squadron, feeling the gravitational G-force. “They must be taking about 7 or 8 Gs. Ohhh, man.”

Next to Erbe, Dale Setzer, 70, is going skydiving. Luitjohan has an iPad that allows him to see what they both are seeing. “There goes your plane,” he told Setzer, “hope your chute works.”

Setzer retired in August. A month later, he crashed his motorcycle during a road trip through the Appalachian Mountains. He was paralyzed from the chest down.

Using virtual reality has played a role in his recovery, said Setzer, a Kansas City-area resident who served in the Army as a combat engineer and jungle warfare instructor from 1969 to 1972. “They convinced me life wasn’t over, and I have a lot of things I can do, I just had to work on it and take it one day at a time.”

Luitjohan and fellow recreational therapist Charley Wright have been interested in incorporating virtual reality into their therapy for the past few years. It became feasible when the equipment became wireless and more affordable (the headsets range from $300 to $500), and the video quality and selection grew.

The St. Louis VA has six virtual reality headsets and space measured on the floor of the vet cave for their motorized wheelchairs to move.

With improvements in 360-degree cameras and a free online collection of virtual videos on YouTube, patients can experience almost anything—ziplining, kayaking, driving a race car, touring a museum or meditating on a beach.

Some veterans can be in the hospital recovering from issues such as major pressure sores for as long as a year, the therapists said.

“It can be boring lying there in bed with only a TV and laptop or people coming to visit to play board games or cards,” Luitjohan said. “Thirty minutes to go somewhere completely different, away from there, is a big change for them.”

Like a Tool Box

Luitjohan and Wright have taken use of the technology further by strapping their own 360-degree cameras to paralyzed athletes participating in adaptive sports like surfing and rock wall climbing, and creating their own virtual videos.

Each year, the therapists take patients to participate in adaptive activities at the Veteran Winter Sports Clinic in Aspen, Colorado. They also take a trip to the Georgia Aquarium to scuba dive with whale sharks and beluga whales. Some, Wright said, are scared to go.

“My hope is that when we show them the videos, they’ll actually want to sign up and go do it,” he said. “That is the full circle of rehab.”

Since many VA patients come from long distances, Luitjohan said, plans are in the works to use the technology to create a virtual replica of patients’ homes before they leave the hospital so they can practice navigating the space to see if adjustments are needed.

The therapists also see benefits in socialization applications, where users can interact with each other’s avatars from a hospital room or home. “They share a bond from being in the military,” Luitjohan said. “Having a social piece where they are able to join and gather with other vets is helpful.”

The use of virtual reality in health care is rapidly evolving and growing, especially as it becomes more affordable.

Some companies have created programs that help caregivers see what it’s like to live with sight or hearing disorders, or even Alzheimer’s by making surroundings confusing. It’s being used to manage pain during physical therapy, teach medical students, test for concussions, teach social skills to people with autism and practice surgeries.

Studies have found positive outcomes in using virtual reality in conditions such as addictions, anxiety disorders, phobias, stroke rehabilitation and pain management. Larger, more rigorous studies are needed, however, to standardize its use in medicine.

“Virtual reality is like a tool box,” Orr said, “and it’s up for the clinician to decide what tool to use form that tool box.”

Walking in Ireland

Aimee Jamison, 50, of Bronston, Kentucky, was in the St. Louis VA from July to December last year after falling from a ladder and shattering her vertebrae. Jamison was paralyzed from the waist down, except for some strength that remained in the front of her legs.

Jamison used virtual reality during her physical therapy.

Using a harness, she is able to move her legs on a treadmill. After having tried virtual reality in recreational therapy, she asked her physical therapists, “Can you set me up so I can feel what it’s like walking in Ireland? I’ve always wanted to go and never been.”

Before her accident, Jamison was a runner, a swimmer and had just opened a quilt-making business. “My world was turned upside down,” said the former counter-intelligence special agent. She feared no longer being active.

The technology helps her feel like she’s driven a boat through obstacle courses, sunk a basketball and touched the ocean from a surf board.

“It makes you want to be able to do that,” Jamison said. “It creates a mental environment that makes you feel like you can do it.”

She’s now learning to scuba dive. On a recent trip back to the St. Louis VA to test robotic legs, she took 373 steps.

“I’m no longer Wonder Woman,” Jamison said. “I’m the Bionic Woman.”

Wright said he hopes the therapy encourages more of the vets he cares for to live fully.

“Whatever this opens up for them, helps,” Wright said. “It might open up doors to things they never even thought they would do even when they were able-bodied.”

Erbe said he’s guilty, just like a lot of people, of getting into a rut and living life’s daily routine as if there’s no other option. The virtual reality makes him see what’s possible.

“It makes me think when I get out of here, I will do those things,” Erbe said. “It’s very good for your morale, your well-being. … This is building a fire, for sure, like stoking the coals.”


Explore further

Using virtual reality, researcher tricks patients with intermittent arterial claudication into walking longer distances


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Collegiate Skydiving Championships Underway in Lake Wales – Bay News 9 https://www.beautyproducts.online/collegiate-skydiving-championships-underway-in-lake-wales-bay-news-9/ Fri, 24 Jan 2020 13:02:10 +0000 https://www.beautyproducts.online/collegiate-skydiving-championships-underway-in-lake-wales-bay-news-9/ LAKE WALES, Fla. – Collegiate skydivers are in Lake Wales this week for the 2019 National Collegiate Skydiving Championships. National Collegiate Skydiving Championships in Lake Wales 78 collegiate skydivers are competiting  The event is held in a different city every year The competition is happening at the Florida Skydiving Center at the Lake Wales Municipal

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LAKE WALES, Fla. – Collegiate skydivers are in Lake Wales this week for the 2019 National Collegiate Skydiving Championships.

  • National Collegiate Skydiving Championships in Lake Wales
  • 78 collegiate skydivers are competiting 
  • The event is held in a different city every year

The competition is happening at the Florida Skydiving Center at the Lake Wales Municipal Airport through New Year’s Eve.

Seventy-eight collegiate skydivers are competing. They spent the first day of the championships competing in sport accuracy, which involves target landing.

“They fly in, and swoop into a course, and try to land right in the middle,” meet director James Hayhurst said.

Many of the competitors are from the United States Air Force Academy, United States Naval Academy and the United States Military Academy known as West Point.

“It’s incredible man,” West Point cadet Connor McQueen said. “The feeling and just the competitive aspect. It’s a sport I really didn’t know much about before coming to West Point. When I got there, I knew it was one of the most competitive teams to make so I tried out.”

Weather delayed the competition from starting Sunday morning, but events kicked off by the afternoon.  Many of the competitors did not come close to hitting the target.

McQueen said the wind created quite the obstacle.

“It’s strong out here so it’s making it a lot tougher,” McQueen said.

The National Collegiate Skydiving Championships have been around since 1958 and are held in a different location each year.

 “It’s the longest, continuous running skydiving parachuting competition in history worldwide,” Hayhurst said.

“Every time we run a championship, it’s a little bit of history taking place.”

Spectators are welcome to come out and watch.  The meet director said the best day to come out is New Year’s Eve.

The championships are from sunrise to sunset.

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Life at Home: New Year, New You https://www.beautyproducts.online/life-at-home-new-year-new-you/ Fri, 24 Jan 2020 13:02:09 +0000 https://www.beautyproducts.online/life-at-home-new-year-new-you/ Posted: 1/23/2020 | January 23rd, 2020 If you’re like me, you know how hard New Year’s resolutions are to keep. “New year, new you” starts with the best intentions, but after a couple of months, it’s back to new year, old you. Old habits die hard, but they can be broken if they are replaced

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The State Capitol building in Austin, Texas on a bright summer day

The State Capitol building in Austin, Texas on a bright summer day


Posted: 1/23/2020 | January 23rd, 2020

If you’re like me, you know how hard New Year’s resolutions are to keep. “New year, new you” starts with the best intentions, but after a couple of months, it’s back to new year, old you.

Old habits die hard, but they can be broken if they are replaced with good ones.

We’re at the start of a new year (and decade), so — as someone who loves a good cliché — I’m going to use this time to build the habits that create a better version of me.

After many years of trying (and writing copious and annoying blog posts about it), last year I finally slowed my travels and moved to Austin. I have a furnished apartment, plants (only two have died so far!), and a recently purchased car (my first ever!).

My days are filled with routine. I wake up, make breakfast, head to WeWork, go to the gym, head home, read, cook dinner, read some more, and go to bed.

My life is the proverbial suburban 9-to-5 I tried to escape from for so many years.

And, for the first January in years, I’m not on the road.

I’ve been enjoying it so much I’ve even begun to dread heading to the airport the same way children dread the dentist.

I used to think routine was a bad thing. It was the thing that killed spontaneity and adventure.

But I’ve come to learn that routine actually creates the framework for excitement and adventure. By scheduling my days and following a routine, I can ensure that I make time for what’s important and for all the things I want to do and goals I hope to accomplish.

So I wrote a list of things to do this year called “Stop Being Boring” with all the things I want to do while in Austin this year: get out more, volunteer, attend city council meetings (first one is next month!), join some social clubs to meet new people, host more meet-ups, and explore more of the city. Now that I have a car, I also plan to see more of Texas and the American South.

Rather than try to read more, I’m going to be a reader.

Rather than try to go to the gym, I’m going to be the person that does.

While I’ve already made some good strides toward eating better and going the gym, the true test will be when I start traveling in February. Will I fall back into old habits? Maybe. But I’m motivated to break them.

This year is also going to be all about focus for me.

I want to focus on work without getting sidetracked by phone calls or Facebook, so I can end my workday earlier.

The internet makes it easy to stretch it from four productive hours to ten unproductive ones, especially when you work for yourself. Now I’m already sitting, undistracted from my tasks, and getting them done quicker!

Next month, I’m going to Hawaii and Taiwan for three weeks before heading back to Paris and Berlin. In the summer, when the weather in Austin is too unbearable, I’m thinking about the Balkans, and maybe some of the ’Stans in the fall. And then in November, I’d like to finally get to Peru.

And while I’ll travel less this year, what trips I do take will be done with more focus. As they say, what’s old is new again, and this year, I’m going to travel without my computer again. Last year, all my travels were just a backdrop for work — and that’s not how I want to see the world.

***

Study after study has shown that by imagining yourself as your desired self, you unconsciously start acting like that person.

I’m determined to make “new year, new me” last the full year. And if I don’t, you’re free to remind me of this post and hold me accountable!

So that’s what I’ve been up to these last few quiet months.

What are your goals for the new year?

Book Your Trip to Austin: Logistical Tips and Tricks

Book Your Flight
Find a cheap flight by using Skyscanner or Momondo. They are my two favorite search engines because they search websites and airlines around the globe so you always know no stone is left unturned.

Book Your Accommodation
You can book your hostel with Hostelworld. If you want to stay elsewhere, use Booking.com as they consistently return the cheapest rates for guesthouses and cheap hotels.

Don’t Forget Travel Insurance
Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. I’ve been using World Nomads for ten years. My favorite companies that offer the best service and value are:

Looking for the best companies to save money with?
Check out my resource page for the best companies to use when you travel! I list all the ones I use to save money when I travel – and I think will help you too!gho

Want More Information on Austin?
Be sure to visit our robust destination guide on Austin for even more planning tips!

Photo credit: 1 – Evgenii

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Flight Shaming: Is Flying Bad for the Environment? https://www.beautyproducts.online/flight-shaming-is-flying-bad-for-the-environment/ Fri, 24 Jan 2020 13:02:08 +0000 https://www.beautyproducts.online/flight-shaming-is-flying-bad-for-the-environment/ Posted: 1/21/2020 | January 20th, 2020 As people become more conscious of their environmental impact on the world, there’s been an increased focus on air travel — and, over the past year, a corresponding increase in “flight shaming”. The term is coined from the Swedish flygskam, which means “flight shame” i.e. you personally feel shame

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A commercial airplane high in the sky, cutting the the clouds and a blue sky

A commercial airplane high in the sky, cutting the the clouds and a blue sky


Posted: 1/21/2020 | January 20th, 2020

As people become more conscious of their environmental impact on the world, there’s been an increased focus on air travel — and, over the past year, a corresponding increase in “flight shaming”. The term is coined from the Swedish flygskam, which means “flight shame” i.e. you personally feel shame about flying but, unsurprisingly, it has devolved into shaming others for flying due to its carbon footprint.

After all, there is no denying that flying increases your personal carbon footprint — a lot. My carbon footprint is undoubtedly through the roof because of all my intense flying habits.

But what can we do? And is focusing on this issue really the best use of our efforts? Just exactly how bad is flying really?

Air travel accounts for only 2.5% of global carbon emissions. In the US, flying accounted for 9% of transportation emissions, but only 3% of total carbon emissions. It’s a drop in the bucket when compared to other industries in the United States:

  • Transportation: 29%
  • Electricity 28%
  • Industry 22%
  • Commercial/Residential 12%
  • Agriculture 9%

So, when looking at the math, flying isn’t really the worst climate offender out there. There are far worse industries out there. Shouldn’t we focus on them?

Cutting down carbon emissions from flying isn’t going to make a big dent in total emissions.

And you can’t just shut off air travel. The world economy relies on it to function. We live in a globalized economy — and benefit from that — because of air travel. Ending all flights would end our modern economy.

Moreover, there are instances where flying is required. I mean, are we going to take boats across the ocean all the time? What if we have to rush to a sick loved one’s side? Driving might take too long.

To me, it seems that we could get bigger wins elsewhere.

But I’m not a scientist. So I called one up to ask about the environmental impact of air travel.

Michael Oppenheimer is a professor at Princeton University, co-founded the Climate Action Network, and has been a leading scientist on climate change for over 30 years. He was one of the principal participants of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. He said:

If you’re a traveler, you have to worry about four things from aviation. One is just the carbon dioxide emissions…number two, you have to worry about the fact that particulate matter from jets can provide surfaces for the formation of clouds, and that that reflects some sunlight…the third thing would be…the production of tropospheric ozone [a greenhouse gas] through the emission of nitrogen oxides…and then there’s a fourth thing, which is that high-flying jets that actually enter the stratosphere can produce some…ozone, and at some altitudes, they may release particulate matter, which would encourage the destruction of ozone.

My conversation with Prof. Oppenheimer gave me pause. It’s just not our carbon footprint we need to worry about when we fly, which makes the total cost of our flights pretty bad. (But, since the carbon effect is the easiest documented, we’re going to focus on that here.) Further research showed that flying is pretty bad.

Most of the time.

While you can say that, generally speaking, flying is worse than any other mode of transportation, the science is tricky because, since there is a surprising number of variables, there’s really no good apples-to-apples comparison. Depending on the make, model, distance, and the number of passengers in your car, driving might be better — or worse — than flying. The same is true with a bus. How many passengers are on that bus?

According to the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), a round-trip flight from NYC to LA produces 1,249 lbs. (566.4 kg) of carbon per person. A car getting an average of 20 miles per gallon produces 4,969.56 lbs. (2,254.15 kg) for the same trip for one person.1

If you’re driving alone, especially over a long distance, it might better to fly. Yet, on that same trip, if you carpool with three other people, you can get your numbers down by a fourth, making driving the better option.

So it turns out there’s no one-size-fits-all answer. You can’t say “flying is bad, never fly” because sometimes it’s better to fly.

That said, a round-trip flight from Paris to London creates 246 lbs (111.5 kg) of carbon while taking the Eurostar (train) will create about 49 lbs (22.2 kg) of carbon.

From Vienna to Brussels, a flight will create 486 lbs (220.4 kg) while the new night train (which takes around 14 hours) will create 88 lbs (39.9 kg) per person.

The International Council on Clean Transportation also came to the same conclusion when they looked into it. It turns out figuring out what mode of transport is quite complicated. As you can see from their chart, no one transportation option is the best every time:

A carbon emissions chart from the ICCT

A carbon emissions chart from the ICCT

So what’s a traveler to do? I felt overwhelmed just researching this article and doing the math on all these example trips. I didn’t realize how complex this was. And, as I explain later, depending on the carbon calculate you use, your numbers can be wildly off. So what can you do? Here are some tips I learned in this process to help reduce the carbon footprint of flying:

1. Avoid short-haul flightsA report from NASA showed that about 25% of airplane emissions occur during takeoff and landing, so if you go on a lot of short-haul flights, you tend to have a higher per-pound footprint. So, flying nonstop rather than a bunch of connecting flights is the better option environmentally.

The longer the distance, the more efficient flying becomes (because cruising altitude requires less fuel than any other stage of flying). If you’re flying a short distance, consider driving or taking a train or bus instead.

2. Buy carbon offsets (or don’t actually) – Carbon offsets offer a way to balance out your pollution by investing in projects that reduce emissions of carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. If you used one ton (2,000 pounds) of carbon, you can support a project like planting trees or clean water initiatives that would produce a saving in carbon equal to what you use (so the scale balances).

Websites such as Green-e, Gold Standard, and Cool Effect can give you a list of good projects to support.

But, while these programs help, they aren’t super effective. For example, it takes 15-35 years for trees to grow big enough to capture carbon.

And carbon offsets just shift the burden of what you’re doing to somewhere else. It’s not an actual reduction in carbon emissions; you’re just investing in something that you hope will take as much out as you put in.

In fact, in a 2017 study of offsets commissioned by the European Commission found that 85% of offset projects under the Kyoto Protocol’s Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) had failed to reduce emissions.

Much of my conversation with Prof. Oppenheimer centered on carbon offsets. He said,

Offsets are good if, and only if, they’re accountable, that is, you’re sure they’re producing the greenhouse gas benefit that they’re advertised at, and that’s sometimes hard to figure out because the emissions are not direct, they’re somewhere else…so, you want to only do offsets and count that as part of your greenhouse gas budget if they’re from an accounting system that’s comprehensive and reliable. Secondly, offsets are good if some have been designed to stimulate technological change or other changes that would not have happened so easily without the offset.

He also said that he could “imagine situations where offsets are fine, even beneficial, but there are a lot of situations where they are not and where they’re…far worse than doing the reduction at…the direct emission site.”

I think this is the point. Offsets don’t have strict controls, so you don’t know if they are really working. And it’s far better to force more efficiency from airlines and build up alternatives to flying in the first place. Much of my research showed that offsets, while making you feel good, aren’t as effective as fighting for reductions directly at their source.

So, you can buy them, but be really careful and do your research into the projects you’re supporting.

3. Fight for better flying – We need to put the pressure on airlines to improve fuel efficiency through new aircraft designs and operations, like implementing the usage of biofuels and planes that run on clean electricity, plus modernizing their fleets. For example, the new Dreamliner has very fuel-efficient engines that reduce CO2 emissions by about 20% in comparison to the planes it replaced. Pressure airlines and fly newer, more fuel-efficient planes when you can. Additionally, try to fly an airline that is generally fuel-efficient.

4. Calculate your footprint – As we’ve seen, sometimes it’s better to fly. Sometimes it’s not. Use a carbon calculator for your trip to see which mode of transportation has the lowest carbon footprint for your trip. If flying is a bad option, look for alternatives like trains, ridesharing like BlaBlaCar, or the bus. Some suggested carbon calculators are:

However, I want to put a big caveat here. My team and I used a lot of calculators for this article. We each found a bunch and tested them ourselves to see if our numbers matched. Like peer review scientific papers, we kept checking each other’s work. We were incredibly shocked to find out just how much variation there was between the carbon calculators. My suggestion is to use multiple calculators to find out what your exact footprint is.

Prof. Oppeniemer concurred, saying, “If the calculator shows that the car is worse, I would believe that, because all this is very sensitive to the load factor. And also…since a lot of fuel is burned on takeoff and landing, the longer the flight, you may sort of amortize the trip if you’re in an airplane.”

5. Fly less – At the end of the day, flying less is the best way to reduce your carbon footprint. Taking lots of flights a year, even if you do some of the lifestyle changes we mention below, is still going to cause your personal footprint to be huge. While the above methods will work, the best you can really do is to look for alternatives as much as possible.

***

I think we should all fly less. I look for ways to fly less all the time. We all need to be more aware of our carbon footprint. But it’s also important to understand, total flight emissions are small compared to other industries. There are so many factors that go into personal carbon footprints that I think we can make a bigger difference through the day-to-day actions we take since, as we’ve seen, most industries have a bigger impact on emissions! Do things like:

  • Buy things that last a long time
  • Buy secondhand
  • Buy local, not online (so much packaging waste)
  • Reduce your plastic consumption
  • Drive less
  • Switch to a hybrid or electric car
  • Eat less takeout to avoid the plastic and other waste that comes with it
  • Eat less meat or go vegetarian or vegan
  • Switch your home heating to renewable energy
  • Change your incandescent light bulbs to LEDs
  • Install low-flow showerheads and toilets

If you don’t fly a lot generally, the things you do every day can have a huge impact on your carbon footprint and help the environment. Let’s not lose the forest through the trees.

***

In today’s “cancel culture,” we’re all supposed to be perfect people — but those who cast the most stones are imperfect too.

We all are.

I don’t believe in flight shaming because, when does shaming someone ever work?

When people feel like their values are attacked, they harden their positions. If you shame someone, they will just do more of the same and become entrenched in their positions. Study after study has shown this to be true.

Telling the person they are bad – when no one ever wants to think of themselves as a bad person – won’t get you anywhere.

That’s not how human psychology works.

Instead, I believe in finding and presenting alternatives.

That’s how you affect change.

I’m not going to judge people who fly. Nor will I judge people who have decided the best way to live their values is to fly less.

If you’re worried about the environmental impact of flying, reduce your own footprint, educate your friends on why they should fly less and find alternative transportation, and contribute to some good organizations that are out there fighting for a greener world:

The world needs immediate action. And there’s a lot you can do to to help. If you want more effective change, donate to NGOs and sociopolitical groups that are pushing climate change action immediately — because the longer we wait, the worse it will get.

Support green-energy projects.

Fund the planting of trees.

Donate to land reclamation.

Fast action will get you more bang for your buck than anything else.

But whatever you do, don’t shame people for flying. That’s not going to do anything.

Book Your Trip: Logistical Tips and Tricks

Book Your Flight
Find a cheap flight by using Skyscanner or Momondo. They are my two favorite search engines because they search websites and airlines around the globe so you always know no stone is left unturned.

Book Your Accommodation
You can book your hostel with Hostelworld as they have the largest inventory. If you want to stay somewhere other than a hostel, use Booking.com as they consistently return the cheapest rates for guesthouses and cheap hotels.

Don’t Forget Travel Insurance
Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. I’ve been using World Nomads for ten years. My favorite companies that offer the best service and value are:

Looking for the best companies to save money with?
Check out my resource page for the best companies to use when you travel! I list all the ones I use to save money when I travel – and that will save you time and money too!

Footnotes
1. There are a lot of emissions calculators out there, and many vary wildly. For flights, I went with the ICAO as it’s the most scientific. For car emissions, I used the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Sources:
We did a lot of research for this post. While we linked to some in our articles, here’s some of the other sources we used for this post:

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The post Flight Shaming: Is Flying Bad for the Environment? appeared first on BeautySupply.

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Recorriendo Indonesia, Bali, Lombok y Komodo con un fascinante vídeo inspirador https://www.beautyproducts.online/recorriendo-indonesia-bali-lombok-y-komodo-con-un-fascinante-video-inspirador/ Fri, 24 Jan 2020 13:02:07 +0000 https://www.beautyproducts.online/recorriendo-indonesia-bali-lombok-y-komodo-con-un-fascinante-video-inspirador/ Indonesia es un país increíble lleno de interés turístico. Con numerosas islas, varias religiones y una vegetación y fauna impresionantes, sus monumentos y tesoros artísticos nos sorprenden siempre. Hoy he seleccionado uno de esos vídeos inspiradores que tanto me gustan, un recorrido por Indonesia visitando Bali, Lombok, Komodo y otras islas, de menos de tres

The post Recorriendo Indonesia, Bali, Lombok y Komodo con un fascinante vídeo inspirador appeared first on BeautySupply.

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Indonesia es un país increíble lleno de interés turístico. Con numerosas islas, varias religiones y una vegetación y fauna impresionantes, sus monumentos y tesoros artísticos nos sorprenden siempre. Hoy he seleccionado uno de esos vídeos inspiradores que tanto me gustan, un recorrido por Indonesia visitando Bali, Lombok, Komodo y otras islas, de menos de tres minutos de duración.

En este vídeo podemos ver también los tesoros bajo las aguas, gracias a la grabación submarina, descubrir las playas de Indonesia y disfrutar de sus aguas turquesas y arenas blancas o de increíbles cascadas y saltos de agua.

Vídeos inspiradores: el lago Baikal

Realizado por Bernardo Bacalhau, con música de Gustavo Santaolalla, es un vídeo dinámico y atractivo que sin duda veréis más de una vez, ya que deja con ganas de más. Ahora solo falta que encontremos la ocasión para volver a aquellas islas y vivirlo personalmente.

En Diario del Viajero | Vídeos inspiradores
En Diario del Viajero | Las Seychelles, las islas del sol

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The post Recorriendo Indonesia, Bali, Lombok y Komodo con un fascinante vídeo inspirador appeared first on BeautySupply.

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